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california where he had moved and eventually she goes to his home which they have a right to do and the man has these wonderful people the adopted three children who the parents were killed and one of them grew up on a pilot and this nurse goes into bob's room and comes to the wall and says why don't you have a dnr it means do not resuscitate. in effect asking him to die. bob's wife, his nurse, his doctor come all the people that saw the nurse do this and her other actions were just appalled by this. warren buffett didn't know of this. on the other hand what does he say about his company? so long as my managers make their numbers, i know the business they see fit and it's indicative of the callousness that is going on where we don't have balancing and we are so focused on profits you can have a company go and say please die. host could you talk in your book about these industries that have been deregulated and people think about regulation in terms of a democrat versus republican issue but or more of the problems created because of democrats or republicans or is this not a party related? >>
@journal.org. talk a little bit about proposition 8 in california. as the impact what could happen this time around? guest: let me go back and say, marriage equality is no longer a partisan issue. if you look at socio-economic trends across this country, americans from all walks of life, all parts of this country, all sorts of americans, republicans, democrats, catholics, episcopalians, they all support marriage equality in majority's right now. that is probably one of the largest of allusions of has taken place since 2006 and 2008. you are right. perhaps the most high-profile marriage equality battle took place in 2008 in california around prop 8. unfortunately, we lost by just a few percentage points. as a result of that, prop. 8, a group called the american foundation for equal rights decided to launch a constitutional challenge for that vote. and it stands for is right now before the supreme court and on november 20, they will decide whether or not to take up that case. host: a paul talking about support for gay marriage. referenced that 50% of those who were polled, say it should be on the bal
a record turn out in california. the secretary of state says many precincts reporting a high volume of voters. 18 million people registered to vote for the election. that is a state record. half of those plan to vote by mail.uu=÷ >> really interesting to see such a large turn out in polling places because i'm also suspecting that we're going to have largest vote by mail turn out in the history of the state. >> that is a big achievement considering only 31% of the eligible voters took part in the june primary. many voters dropped off ballot was out leaving their cars. san jose's most watched race is measure did. california schools banking on prop 30, governor jerry brown proposed that plan, today voted for it. people in oakland greeted him in the oakland hills, proposition 30 raises money for public schools and community colleges and temporarily add a quarter cent tax to state sales tax and raise taxes for californians earning more than $250,000 a year. opponents say it's too expensive. here is a look at propositions. prop 32 preventing unions from deducting money from paychecks to
in santa barbara, california. caller: hello. good morning. i guess my comment is, and kind of glad that the spectacle of elections are over. and maybe we can start to focus on some of the serious issues that still remain. i notice you just made a comment that reid had put out an olive branch to john boehner and mitch mcconnell. i am hoping that at some point in the future that may be c-span can run some segments on the article 5 convention. i really think that we needed to a convention of state delegates to deliberate over certain issues that none of the candidates talked about. i am very concerned about proprietary source codes and electronic voting machines. i am concerned about voter fraud, i am concerned about corporate control of what makes it out of a committee to the floor for a vote and what does not. my comment is, am glad the elections are over. i hope it can start to address some serious issues. host: that is john in santa barbara. usa today lead editorial -- voters can obama a subdued second term mandate. barack obama is election in 2008 made history purity become the f
. and even campaigning for incoming members who were in cakewalks in north carolina and cowart -- california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail.possibly in he to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be run around a corner -- right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still count
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we all wearing rose colored glasses? i am sure some of his closest friends for making comments or had some kind of reservation about what was happening. the two of them together look very happy in conversation. i imagine that they had many, many other clandestine, you know, appearances together. the thing is, the thing that is hurtful is for the family. and, of course, the military and the government, there are a lot of answers. he will be held to a higher accounting. he has to bring it out. the pentagon will do that as well. the cia, the fbi, the president, all making sure that this is not swept un
the campaign. >> remember when carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
in california. hi tara. >> i'm a big fan. i downloaded the sexy liberal tour and i'm going to go see the next show next time you're in the bay area. >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: i have something to say about mccain and romney but first i want to thank you that you never make us listen to -- and give equal time to the dodos on the other side. i appreciate that. >> stephanie: we're anti-dodo. thank you. >> caller: i just wanted to say about mccain in my opinion he lost all credibility the day he accepted sarah palin as his vice presidential candidate. >> stephanie: can you believe he called susan rice not very bright? >> caller: wow. i wouldn't take his opinion on very much. both romney and mccain could have been serious threats if they had run moderates they used to be. >> stephanie: right. his comments about the gifts and then 47% comments before that, it goes to show you what the thing we were always the most afraid of. he's not a moderate. >> caller: no. he was faking it when he was pretending to be a moderate
the non- battleground states. we will go to california, on our line for republicans, helen, you are on. caller: good morning. i am a first-time caller. please do not cut me off. host: go ahead. caller: i will be so glad when this election is over. i was raised a republican. my whole entire life, never voted anything but republican. but i tell you what, anyone -- i switched this year, i was born to go independent, but i am going to go for barack obama. anyone that will vote for mitt romney has to be a 100% raist, or have a severe -- a 100% racist or have a severe mental problem. host: are you glad you are not subject to all of the presidential ads and mailings coming and to folks in ohio? caller: i am so glad. and i watched c-span, and the comments that i hear from the people, it is so sad. why do they hate this black president? and one thing i want to make clear. i am not voting for obama because we are black. host: we lost you there. i want to point to the columbus dispatch. the headline is -- mailings a nuisance for ohioans. those of any swing states are saying it every day, calling
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
and gentleman, the senator from the state of california, the honorable dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, leader pelosi, mrs. bush, leader reed, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government, this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years, i have followed the tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988, she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying has been -- husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassina
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
. california passing a measure that raises the state sales tax by a quarter of a percent, and the income tax for high earners. maryland became the first date in the nation to grant institution breaks for illegal immigrants. there is a direction here, is in there? a tale of two shearson aggressive arizona. a sixth term. and 80-year-old mary republican who calls himself the toughest sheriff in america, and lots of people believe him. for it -- further south, a second term. a 43-year-old openly gay republican and a very public dispute with his former lover who is also an illegal immigrant both men won a convincing 53% margins of the vote. perhaps a metaphor, if not for arizona, for the country. i have to tell you, i like both of these guys. they do good work. up next, congress now on the clock. the nation less than two months from going over the fiscal cliff. will they put the country before partisanship? the "a-team" taking that up and more. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyd
coastal town in california. he was the subject, on the fbi most wanted list and responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pak
will be seen in retrospect as something close to the proposition in california. incredibly shortsighted with long-term consequences. whatever those republican governors and legislators thought they were doing, every latino population in the country and thought not only are you not competing for are revoked, you do not want our vote to. the gop is not even getting up to have argument about policies of this point. there is this time of tremendous identity of -- how often do you go to church? there is the identity politics. our system is frozen with the two out of three close presidential elections happening. >> right here. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking a
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
but actually you can't tell the total number of votes in the nation until california gets around to doing it. you know, some states count them very clean and don't seem to have any problem. >> megyn: how about virginia? is that true of virginia. >> virginia, that has been true. when george allen was defeated for senator six years ago by 6,000 or 7,000 votes, virginia went right down, you know, they went back over that, i believe there was recount or reexpectation of the vote, less than 100 votes changed. it was pretty straightforward. new hampshire is famous for doing that well, too and so forth. other states have had bigger problems. >> bret: we should point out if we put that back up. that was the national popular vote total. that will pop up throughout the night as well. you will see the actual vote total through the night. these are all the states throughout the nation and there you see it as it continues to tick up and for us, after the iowa caucuses, the difference was added, 61256 right now so i don't have to pull out the calculator. >> megyn: didn't you get yelled at by math teacher
votes right now in california. when they meet this will be on the agenda and should be on the agenda. remember two ways to disinfranchise people. we want that. and another way to be disinfranchised someone who shouldn't be voting cancelled your vote out. >> the book who's counting and how they put your vote at risk. thank you, john. >> gretchen: how many of you think you are better off now than four years ago. stunning worry from the exit polls. on works for president obama. and he's up next . ♪ >> tonight, more than 200 yearrs after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the path of perfecting our union moves forward. begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robituss
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
initiative in california referendum indicates that the walls are coming down and some things from before. remember from the 1984 convention. he talked about raising taxes. that is no longer a taboo issue. i think you'll find some political liberal stuff and social liberal. >> the racial division on this is enormous. and exit polls, 60% of voters said they wanted to repeal the health care bill. large portions of african- americans and hispanics want to maintain it. a big challenge for democrats is that it is time to help unify power and government whether it was under johnson, carter, clinton, obama, they have seen their support among whites and plunge it said the delay. the challenge of convincing a much of white americans to benefit them is still on the table. the number you need to convince -- >> one of the problems the democratic party has had is that it has not been willing to defend government. it has always been specific. maybe obama learned something from his first term in terms of putting things into perspective. -- his victory speech had some of those elements. >> we will turn t
in "the new york times." tomorrow the city of richmond, california, could become the first city in america to tax businesses that sell sodas or other sweetened drinks. excellent. outside groups have spent nearly $2.5 million to try to defeat the ballot proposal but healthy americans will vote for it. the tampa bay times after sunday's new york city marathon was canceled, hundreds of runners head ed off to staten island with backpacks filled with supplies for those displaced by hurricane sandy. several other cities throughout the u.s. are opening their doors to runners looking for another marathon. this weekend the pensacola marathon is holding its ninth annual race and has offered spots to displaced new york city marathon runners. that's fantastic. pensacola is beautiful. you can get more information on their website at marathonpensacola.com. ♪ ♪ mom? dad? guys? [ engine turns over ] [ engine revs ] ♪ he'll be fine. [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. take advantage of exceptional values during the season of audi event. we cre
what the impact will be on the national figures in the race for president. california, washington, hawaii have gone for obama, idahoor romney. no big surprises there for people. as you see there with the big vote, the national vote here, mitt romney still showing up here at 2 percentage points ahead of barack obama. right now the eyes of the obama and romney campaigns are watching the fates of their campaigns and the future of the nation, all coming in as each return comes in. abc 7 is your election station tonight. senior political reporter is live at the obama campaign. he's in chicago. let's check in with him. >> we have a long and uncertain night but don't tell that to the cheerers here at obama head quarters in chicago. they are very upbeat as they watch the results come in. particularly when they have seen the numbers come in in pennsylvania, from wisconsin, from new hampshire. they believe that gives them a clear path. they also say senior staff that i talked to early tonight that they read the tea leaves yesterday when they saw mitt romney in ohio. they say that was, quote
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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